reflections from rob.

mjkimpan  —  March 3, 2014 — 3 Comments

 

robandi

it’s been quite some time since i flew out to laguna beach to spend a few days with rob bell. i wrote briefly about the fact that i was gong to the 2Days with Rob micro-conferences put on by the evangelical black sheep, and mentioned in a few posts  (here, here and here) that it was an incredibly encouraging time where i connected deeply with a number of folks.

if you’ve paid close enough attention to my blog, you might have even realized that i’m actually even keeping up with his tumblr blog (and encourage you to do the same ) – evidence of a lasting influence created in such a short time together.

but i’ve not yet revealed what i learned.

Continue Reading…

real life observations.

mjkimpan  —  February 28, 2014 — Leave a comment

reallife

being a bit of an ass online is easy.
loving people online is easy, too.

well, easier.

in real life, you don’t get to unplug. you don’t get to give yourself an opportunity to calm down and respond after taking a few moments to regain your composure or talk your way through an argument in an imaginary conversation with the image staring back at you in your bathroom mirror ‘just in case.’

in real life, you can’t delete what you just posted because you realize it wasn’t at all appropriate to whatever audience you were addressing.

Continue Reading…

one of the greatest challenges of teaching is showing people where to look
without telling them what to see.

oh, uganda…

mjkimpan  —  February 24, 2014 — 1 Comment

ugandabill

 

today, ugandan president yoweri museveni signed into law an archaic anti-gay bill which i’ve written about herehere, here and here. the bill, which at one time even included the death penalty, calls for ugandans or anyone ‘promoting’ homosexuality to be jailed, potentially for life.

Continue Reading…

refusing to refuse.

mjkimpan  —  February 21, 2014 — Leave a comment

footwashing

it was almost time.

three years had passed since jesus first extended the invitation to this rag-tag group of curiously single jewish men.

‘follow me,’ he had said.

they were misfits, all of them. yet they found in their brotherhood a sense of solidarity with one another, in spite of their differences. this, of course, laid the ground work for their eventual understanding of christ’s stand in solidarity with all of humanity. Continue Reading…

isn’t it interesting that jesus, in his life of love, was never accused of hatred? perhaps when we ‘speak the truth in love’ and are misinterpreted as being hateful, it is us who has misinterpreted what love truly is.

for the record.

mjkimpan  —  February 17, 2014 — 3 Comments

fortherecord

much ink has been spilled in recent weeks regarding anti-gay legislation around the world- not just in russia, but in ugandazambianigeriacameroon and elsewhere.

and then this week, it hit home.

kansas attempted to pass a law which would allow the blanket discrimination of LGBT people, but failed. in arizona, legislation did pass, though it is likely to be vetoed by their governor (and even if not, will almost certainly be struck down as unconstitutional in the courts).

similar legislation was introduced in ohio, mississippi, idaho, south dakota, tennessee and oklahoma.

this is real, people.

Continue Reading…

fore!

mjkimpan  —  February 14, 2014 — 3 Comments

fore

i’m less interested in hearing what someone is against than i am in hearing what someone is for.

it’s for that reason that i’m compelled to tell a better story – to define myself not as what i want to fight, but rather what i support. i think that’s better news. Continue Reading…

sacredness.

mjkimpan  —  February 12, 2014 — Leave a comment

sacredness

 

Despite what you might have learned in Economics 101, people aren’t always selfish. In politics, they’re more often groupish. When people feel that a group they value — be it racial, religious, regional or ideological — is under attack, they rally to its defense, even at some cost to themselves. We evolved to be tribal, and politics is a competition among coalitions of tribes.

The key to understanding tribal behavior is not money, it’s sacredness. The great trick that humans developed at some point in the last few hundred thousand years is the ability to circle around a tree, rock, ancestor, flag, book or god, and then treat that thing as sacred. People who worship the same idol can trust one another, work as a team and prevail over less cohesive groups. So if you want to understand politics, and especially our divisive culture wars, you must follow the sacredness.

from jonathan haidt’s, The Righteous Mind :: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion.

i suspect the more we remind ourselves of the way in which christ engaged his culture, the better we’ll do at engaging our own.